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Mauritian Dal Puri

6th April 2017
Cuisine
Serves approximately 20 dal puris
Equipment
large heavy based non-stick pan or tawa (roti pan)
large mixing bowl
palette knife or long knife
a whole roll of paper towel
rolling pin
greaseproof paper
pastry brush
Prep time
5h 0m
Cook Time
1h 5m

Make delicious dal puris

Make delicious dal puris

It seems that dal puri is one of the most requested recipes ever!  And although it is, in essence just 6 ingredients, there is some skill and processes that need to be followed for a successful dal puri. These skills makes the difference between a thick, dry dal puri or a lovely thin, soft and delicious dal puri.

 

Let’s get this straight. I do not claim to be the expert on dal puri. But I think I know enough to make quite decent ones and share my version with others.

I was taught how to make dal puri by my good friend Fifi! She is such a good friend!

After having spent years enjoying hers I thought it was time I learnt how to make my own and she kindly obliged!  So I filmed the whole process in her kitchen years ago on my Nokia!  It is safe to say that I have no idea where that phone is now and I rely completely on my memory and experience!!

So let’s take a look at Mauritian dal puri (Dholl Puri or Dal Pouri, whichever way you want to spell it!)

Unlike most Caribbean dal puris or rotis, the mauritian version is much, much thinner and smaller in comparison.  For us dal puri isn’t a main meal, unlike other cultures that make huge ones and fill them to the brim with curry (yum yum!). Our dal puris are usually eaten with rougaille (tomato based creole sauce), or a butter bean curry and sold in pairs.  A coriander chutney is usually in the mix somewhere! ***rubs hands together in delight***

 

Pay attention to this very important tip! When cooking the dal puri you must turn it as soon as you see some bubbles. As I stress below, the process of cooking one dal puri should not take longer than 30 seconds otherwise you end up with dry dal puri!

 

Anyway, enough blah blah blah-ing and let’s get on with it.

Mauritian Dal Pita

28th July 2016
image

Yes, I know! Pulses again! I Lurve pulses!! Even though I’m not a veggie, I loves me some pulses!

Here we have Dal Pita. Usually made with chana dal or yellow peas and filled with flat dumplings. But here I am using red lentils, cos I ran out of dal!! ? So ingredients in MY version are:

Red lentils
Onions
Garlic ginger
Green chillies (can use dried red chillies)
Tumeric powder
Mustard seeds
Cumin seeds
Salt
Spinach leaves

Flour
Enough water to make a soft dough. Not sticky!
Salt

METHOD:

Mix your flour, salt and flour to make a soft dough. Let rest for 30mins.

Once the dough has rested, wash and dry lentils and place in a pot and cover with salted water. Make sure you have a least 2cm of water above the lentils. Bring to the boil and cook till tender.

When the lentils are 10 minutes away from being cooked, roll out your dough on a well floured surface to about 5mm thick. Thin enough to handle comfortably. Cut into 2cm squares and place into the pot one by one. Do not overcrowd the pot.

When the lentils and dumplings are pratically done, chop your onions and crush your garlic, ginger and chillies. Heat some oil in a pan and start frying the mustard and cumin seeds and the onions till the seeds begin to pop and the onion brown slightly. Now add the garlic/ginger/chilli mix and fry till you smell the mixture. The throw in the Tumeric and stir for a few seconds. Now stir the mixture into the lentils and simmer till the spices are incorporated.
Near the end, add your spinach leaves to wilt.

Voila!! TIPS:

When using chana dal, soak for at least 2 hours before cooking or overnight is best.

Mauritian Brown Lentils Stew

28th July 2016
image
Cuisine
Course
Serves 4 People
Prep time
24m
Cook Time
45m

Probably my favourite. I can eat this with basmati rice on it’s own.

Wash and soak your lentils over night.

Cover with plenty of salted water, a bay leaf, parsley and fresh thyme and boil. Remember to remove the white scum from the pot as it boils.

Let simmer for at least an hour till lentils are lovely and creamy and the water has reduced to make a yummy lentil broth.

Now for the magic.

Chop some onions and crush some garlic and ginger. Fry the onions till soft then add the garlic and ginger and fry. Make sure you don’t burn the garlic.

Add the magic to the lentils and let simmer for 5 minutes.

Chop some coriander and add the lentils with the fire off. And voila! The yummiest lentils you have ever had.

Potato Curry

17th February 2016
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Cuisine
Course
Serves 6 People
Equipment
Medium to large pan
Prep time
20m
Cook Time
30m

The way to a man’s heart! Roti and curry!!!! Making Roti is a practiced skill! Getting the flavours and textures right is a skill. But getting perfectly round is a true art form that I haven’t been able to achieve quite yet.
A nice potato curry always goes down well with a Roti (Caribbean dal puri). Having a good curry blend is half the work! Make your own or buy one you trust!
If I don’t have any curry powder I do quick one ; equal partsground cumin, ground coriander and a quarter part ground tumeric blend.

We’ll get to the Roti another time, which really needs a video tutorial!!

Mauritian Style Salmon Pasties

14th February 2016
Mauritian Salmon Patties
Cuisine
Course
Serves 30 mini pasties
Equipment
rolling pin
fork
baking tray cover in grease proof papaer
Prep time
30m
Cook Time
15m

 “Gajacks” (Mauritian for beer food – I mean- snacks). Pâtès aux Salmon ( salmon pasties!). Usually this is made with tuna and deep fried.  But I’ve always had an issue with deep fried short crust pastry, so I baked them in the oven. The pastry has enough butter in it as it is! And there is always the risk of oil seeping into the pasties.  Ugh!

I also chose to use canned salmon rather than the traditional canned tuna.  I had them both in my hand and I thought, nah, tuna not today mate.

Again, these are bite size. So, brilliant for any social gathering. Also, when you have lots of bite size things, people get fuller quicker and with a lots less food. No idea why. Must be psychological.  I mean, how many samosas, gateaux piments, spring rolls, and Patès de Salmon can you possibly eat in one sitting???? Ok, after I finish the Mauri-Sub business I’m going into Mauri-canapès!!! Lol!

Any-who……. Back to the Patès de Salmon.